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In his essay ‘Sacraments of the New Society’ Rowan Williams describes Jesus in the Last Supper as ‘passing over’ into the symbolic forms of bread and wine by his own word and gesture, which is a ‘transition into the vulnerable and inactive forms of the inanimate world’.1 By resigning himself into the signs of food and drink, putting himself into the hands of other agents, he signifies his forthcoming helplessness and death. He announces himself by ‘signing’ himself as a thing, to be handled and
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  In his essay ‘Sacraments of the New Society’ Rowan Williams describes Jesus in the Last Supper as ‘passing over’ into the symbolic forms of bread and wine by his own word and gesture, which is a ‘transition into the vulnerable and inactive forms of the inanimate world’. 1  By resigning himself into the signs of food and drink, putting himself into the hands of other agents, he signifies his forthcoming helplessness and death. He announces himself by ‘signing’ himself as a thing, to be handled and consumed. 2   In doing so Jesus anticipates his being „given over‟, his betrayal by those at the fea st. Thus, by his surrender into the passive forms of bread and wine he „makes void and  powerless the impending betrayal, and, more, makes the betrayers his guests and debtors‟. This relinquishing of power in the face of betrayal, desertion and violence, al lows Jesus, paradoxically, to „shape and structure the situation‟. 3  In a particularly fascinating passage Williams suggests that this renunciation and passing into the inert forms of the bread and wine puts „some questions against an instrumentalist view o f material objects. 4   He quotes Simone Weil‟s notion, from her notebooks, about the world of „dead‟ matter as the active incarnation of God, as it represents the „supreme integrity 1  Rowan William, On Christian Theology  (Oxford, Malden: Blackwell, 2000), 219 2  Ibid 3  Ibid, 216 4  Ibid, 217  of divine self-effacement as the only way in which divine love can be received by use without idolatry and distortion‟. God empties himself of his divinity by becoming man, then of His humanity, by becoming a corpse, bread and wine, matter. 5   To read Derrida against Derrida, and to say, with Richard Iveson that the trace continues with the living and the non-living Jean-Hugues Barthelemy on Gilbert Simondon My thesis will be more precisely the following: humanity is that form of  psycho-social life which, by means of the non-living artefacts that support it and  found its historicity, extends bio-psychic animal life of which the non-living condition is not yet the artefact but simple apoptosis (‘cellular suicide’), and whose srcin is a third form of ‘non - life’: the chemical non-living. Simondon and Whitehead Alfred North Whitehea d…  Bryant, Bogost, Harman Harman radicalises the ideas of Martin Heidegger, as his starting point, and in particular his development of ‘tool - analysis’ in Being and Time In Being and Time Heidegger famously analysed our relation to tools (equipment, ‘zeug’ ) by distinguishing between our normal experience most of the time, in which the tool is ‘ready -to- hand’ 5  Ibid, 217 - 8  (zuhandenheit), and in which we merely use it, without being properly aware of it conceptually as an object, and the times we do become aware of its ‘b eing-at- hand’ (vorhandenheit). Though Heidegger fails to capitalise on this, Harman see in this analysis an acknowledgement of the autonomous life of objects beyond our apprehension of them In Vibrant Matter   Bennett, discusses the active participation of nonhuman forces in events. Toward that end, she theorizes a “vital materiality” that runs through and across bodies, both human and nonhuman. Bennett explores how political analyses of public events might change were we to acknowledge that agency always emerges as the   effect of ad hoc configurations of human and nonhuman forces. She suggests that recognizing that agency is distributed this way, and is not solely the province of humans, might spur the cultivation of a more responsible, ecologically sound politics: a politics less devoted to blaming and condemning individuals than to discerning the web of forces affecting situations and events. Bennett examines the political and theoretical implications of vital materialism through extended discussions of commonplace things and physical phenomena including stem cells, fish oils, electricity, metal, and trash. She reflects on the vital power of material formations such as landfills, which generate lively streams of chemicals, and omega-3 fatty acids, which can transform brain chemistry and mood. In his book The Democracy of Objects Levi Bryant develops what he calls ‘onticology’, a flat ontology where objects of all sorts and at different scales equally exist without being  reducible to other objects and where there are no transcendent entities such as eternal essences outside of dynamic interactions among objects. In his book the Ecological Thought. In the latter Morton argues that all forms of life are connected in a vast, entangling mesh. This interconnectedness penetrates all dimensions of life. No being, construct, or object can exist independently from the ecological entanglement, Morton contends, nor does “Nature” exist as an entity separate from the uglier or more synthetic elements of life. In  Alien Phenomenology, or What It's Like to Be a Thing , Ian Bogost develops an object-oriented ontology that puts things at the center of being; a philosophy in which nothing exists any more or less than anything else; in which humans are elements, but not the sole or even primary elements, of philosophical interest. And unlike experimental phenomenology or the philosophy of technology, Bogost's alien phenomenology takes for granted that all beings interact with, perceive, and experience one another. This experience, however, withdraws from human comprehension and only becomes accessible through a speculative philosophy based on metaphor. Latour n a recent paper, „Will Non -Humans be Saved: An Argument in Eco- Theology‟, Latour   makes a strong case for the ecological relevance of the Eucharist, and its potential for a  better response to our current environmental crises.
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