The Fox and the Crowl

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Short tales The Fox and The Crow A Fox once saw a Crow fly off with a piece of cheese in its beak and settle on a branch of a tree. That's for me, as I am a Fox, said Master Reynard, and he walked up to the foot of the tree. Good day, Mistress Crow, he cried. How well you are looking today: how glossy your feathers; how bright your eye. I feel sure your voice must surpass that of other birds, just as your figure does; let me hear but one song from you that I may greet you as the Queen of Bi
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  Short tales   The Fox and The Crow A Fox once saw a Crow fly off with a piece of cheese in its beak and settle on a branch of a tree. That's for me, as I am a Fox, said Master Reynard, and he walked up to the foot of the tree. Good day, Mistress Crow, he cried. How well you are looking today: how glossy your feathers; how bright your eye. I feel sure your voice must surpass that of other birds, just as your figure does; let me hear but one song from you that I may greet you as the Queen of Birds. The Crow lifted up her head and began to caw her best, but the moment she opened her mouth the piece of cheese fell to the ground, only to be snapped up by Master Fox. That will do, said he. That was all I wanted. In exchange for your cheese I will give you a piece of advice for the future: Do not trust flatterers. The Ant and the Grasshopper In a field one summer's day a Grasshopper was hopping about, chirping and singing to its heart's content. An Ant passed by, bearing along with great toil an ear of corn he was taking to the nest. Why not come and chat with me, said the Grasshopper, instead of toiling and moiling in that way? I am helping to lay up food for the winter, said the Ant, and recommend you to do the same. Why bother about winter? said the Grasshopper; We have got plenty of food at present. But the Ant went on its way and continued its toil. When the winter came the Grasshopper had no food and found itself dying of hunger - while it saw the ants distributing every day corn and grain from the stores they had collected in the summer. Then the Grasshopper knew: It is best to prepare for days of need. The Boy Who Cried Wolf A shepherd-boy, who watched a flock of sheep near a village, brought out the villagers three or four times by crying out, Wolf! Wolf! and when his neighbors came to help him, laughed at them for their pains. The Wolf, however, did truly come at last. The Shepherd-boy, now really alarmed, shouted in an agony of terror: Pray, do come and help me; the Wolf is killing the sheep ; but no one paid any heed to his cries, nor rendered any assistance. The Wolf, having no cause of fear, at his leisure lacerated or destroyed the whole flock. There is no believing a liar, even when he speaks the truth.  The miser A miser sold all that he had and bought a lump of gold, which he buried in a hole in the ground by the sidan old wall and went to look at daily. One of his workmen observed his frequent visits to the spot and decided to watch his movements. He soon discovered the secret of the hidden treasure, and digging downcame to the lump of gold, and stole it. The Miser, on his next visit, found the hole empty and began to teahis hair and to make loud lamentations. A neighbor, seeing him overcome with grief and learning the caussaid, Pray do not grieve so; but go and take a stone, and place it in the hole, and fancy that the gold is slying there. It will do you quite the same service; for when the gold was there, you had it not, as you did make the slightest use of it. The Tortoise and the Hare The Hare was once boasting of his speed before the other animals. I have never yet been beaten, said h when I put forth my full speed. I challenge any one here to race with me. The Tortoise said quietly, I accept your challenge. That is a good joke, said the Hare; I could dance round you all the way. Keep your boasting till you've won, answered the Tortoise. Shall we race? So a course was fixed and a start was made. The Hare darted almost out of sight at once, but soon stopped and, to show his contempt for the Tortoise, lay down to have a nap. The Tortoise plodded on and plodded on, and when the Hare awoke from his nap, he saw the Tortoise just near the winning-post and could not run up in time to save the race. Then the Tortoise said: Slow but steady progress wins the race. The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing A Wolf found great difficulty in getting at the sheep owing to the vigilance of the shepherd and his dogs. Bone day it found the skin of a sheep that had been flayed and thrown aside, so it put it on over its own peland strolled down among the sheep. The Lamb that belonged to the sheep whose skin the Wolf was wearing began to follow the Wolf in the Sheep's clothing. So, leading the Lamb a little apart, he soon made a meal off her - and for some time he succeeded in deceiving the sheep, and enjoying hearty meals. Appearances are deceptive. High and Lifted Up It was a windy day. The mailman barely made it to the front door. When the door opened, Mrs. Pennington said, hello , bbefore she had a real chance to say thank you , the mail blew out of the mailman's hands, into the houseand the front door slammed in his face. Mrs. Pennington ran to pick up the mail. Oh my, she said. Tommy was watching the shutters open and then shut, open and then shut.    Mom, he said, may I go outside? Be careful, she said. It's so windy today. Tommy crawled down from the window-seat and ran to the door. He opened it with a bang. The wind blew fiercely and snatched the newly recovered mail from Mrs. Pennington's hands and blew it even furtheinto the house. Oh my, she said again. Tommy ran outside and the door slammed shut. Outside, yellow, gold, and red leaves were leaping from swaying trees, landing on the roof, jumping of the roof, and then chasing one another down the street in tiny whirlwinds of merriment. Tommy watched in fascination. If I was a leaf, I would fly clear across the world, Tommy thought and then ran out into the yard amthe swirl of colors. Mrs. Pennington came to the front porch. Tommy, I have your jacket. Please put it on. However, there was no Tommy in the front yard. Tommy? Tommy was a leaf. He was blowing down the street with the rest of his play-mates. A maple leaf came close-by, touched him and moved ahead. Tommy met him shortly, brushed against him, and moved further ahead. They swirled around and around, hit cars and poles, flew up into the air anthen down again. <  2  >   This is fun, Tommy thought. The maple leaf blew in front of him. It was bright red with well-defined veins. The sun-light shone through it giving it a brilliance never before seen by a little boy's eyes. Where do you think we are going? Tommy asked the leaf. Does it matter? the leaf replied. Have fun. Life is short. I beg to differ, an older leaf said suddenly coming beside them. The journey may be short, but the eis the beginning. Tommy pondered this the best a leaf could ponder. Where do we end up? If the wind blows you in that direction, the old leaf said, you will end up in the city dump. I don't want that, Tommy said. If you are blown in that direction, you will fly high into the air and see things that no leaf has seen before. Follow me to the city dump, the maple leaf said. Most of my friends are there.    The wind blew Tommy and the maple leaf along. Tommy thought of his choices. He wanted to continueplay. Okay, Tommy said, I will go with you to the dump. The winds shifted and Tommy and the leaf were blown in the direction of the city dump. The old leaf didn't follow. He was blown further down the block and suddenly lifted up high into the air.  Hey, he called out, the sights up here. They are spectacular. Come and see. <  3  >   Tommy and the maple leaf ignored him. I see something. I see the dump. The old leaf cried out. I see smoke. Come up here. I see fire. I see nothing, the maple leaf said. Tommy saw the fence that surrounded the city dump. He was happy to be with his friend. They would have fun in the dump. Suddenly, a car pulled up. It was Tommy's mom. Mrs. Pennington wasn't about to let her little boy run into the city dump. Not so fast, she said getting out of the car. You are not allowed to play in there. Don't you see the smoke? Tommy watched the maple leaf blow against the wall and struggle to get over. He ran over to get it buwas unable to reach it. Mrs. Pennington walked over and took the leaf. She put it in her pocket. There, she said, it will be safe until we get home. Tommy smiled, ran to the car and got in. He rolled down the back window and looked up into the sky. wondered where the old leaf had gone. Perhaps one day he would see what the old leaf had seen - perhap 
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