VoLTE Deployment and the Radio Access Network

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VoLTE DePlOYMeNt ANd tHe RAdIO ACCeSS NetWORK August 2012 The LTE User Equipment Perspective Rev. A 08/12 SPIRENT 1325 Borregas Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 USA Email: sales@spirent.com Web: http://www.spirent.com AMeriCas 1-800-SPIRENT ã +1-818-676-2683 ã sales@spirent.com EUrOpe anD tHe MiDDLe East +44 (0) 1293 767979 ã emeainfo@spirent.com Asia anD tHe PaCiFiC +86-10-8518-2539 ã salesasia@spirent.com © 2012 Spirent. All Rights Reserved. All of the company names and/or brand names and/
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  Rev. A 08/12  VoLTE DEPLOYMENT AND THE RADIO ACCESS NETWORK The LTE User Equipment Perspective August 2012  SPIRENT  1325 Borregas Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 USAEmail: sales@spirent.com Web: http://www.spirent.com  AMERICAS  1-800-SPIRENT   ã +1-818-676-2683  ã sales@spirent.com EUROPE AND THE MIDDLE EAST +44 (0) 1293 767979  ã emeainfo@spirent.com  ASIA AND THE PACIFIC  +86-10-8518-2539  ã salesasia@spirent.com © 2012 Spirent. All Rights Reserved.All of the company names and/or brand names and/or product names referred to in this document, in particular, the name “Spirent” and its logo device, are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Spirent plc and its subsidiaries, pending registration in accordance with relevant national laws. All other registered trademarks or trademarks are the property of their respective owners.The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on the part of Spirent. The information in this document is believed to be accurate and reliable; however, Spirent assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in the document.   VoLTE Deployment and the Radio Access Network The LTE User Equipment Perspective SPIRENT WHITE PAPER ã   i CONTENTS Introduction.....................................................1Dedicated Bearers................................................3Semi-Persistent Scheduling ........................................6Robust Header Compression .......................................8Discontinuous Reception .........................................10Transmission Time Interval Bundling................................12LTE Voice and Legacy Voice Services ................................13Considerations for LTE UE Developers ...............................14Summary ......................................................16  1   ã   SPIRENT WHITE PAPER VoLTE Deployment and the Radio Access Network The LTE User Equipment Perspective INTRODUCTION One promise of Long Term Evolution (LTE) is the availability of a relatively flat, all-IP access technology that provides a bandwidth-efficient method of delivering multiple types of user traffic simultaneously. Indeed, the ability to deploy Voice over IP (VoIP) services such as Voice over LTE (VoLTE), while also allowing high-rate data transfers, is one of the principal drivers for the evolution to LTE.In the context of deploying VoLTE, a lot of emphasis has been placed on the realization of an IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) and its associated Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) in a wireless environment. Undeniably, IMS and SIP are key to deploying VoIP services such as VoLTE in LTE networks. It is IMS that provides the interconnect and gateway functionalities that allow VoIP devices to communicate with non-VoIP devices or even non-wireless devices. SIP defines the signaling necessary for call establishment, tear-down, authentication, registration and presence maintenance, as well as providing for supplementary services like three-way calling and call waiting.Without SIP signaling, or at least a proprietary equivalent, it would not be possible to provide VoIP telephony services. Without IMS or its equivalent, VoIP services would be limited to establishing calls between two VoIP users on the same network, and would not allow calls to users on parallel or legacy technologies. Therefore, it is no wonder that recent User Equipment (UE) testing and measurement has focused on two areas: ã The UE’s ability to establish and maintain connectivity with an IMS network, including all of the registration, authentication, security and mobility associated with this connectivity ã The UE’s conformance to SIP signaling protocol and SIP procedures/call flows, including any number of extensions that may be used in different deployment scenarios CORRESPONDING LITERATURE WHITE PAPERIMS Architecture: The LTE User Equipment PerspectiveREFERENCE GUIDEIMS Procedures and Protocols: The LTE User Equipment PerspectivePOSTERSLTE and the Mobile InternetIMS/VoLTE Reference Guide
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