What is this New Adult Fiction: A new category of literature or stepped up YA novels?

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NCompass Live - 3/2/16 http://nlc.nebraska.gov/ncompasslive/ In the last few years we've witnessed a boom in Young Adult literature both in the marketing of books and its readership. YA literature includes many firsts such as: first crush, first kiss, first love, first moral dilemma. The birth of New Adult literature takes it one step further. As the YA readers age out publishers are seeing New Adult as the next, new step. But what does New Adult literature mean for editors, publishing companies and librarians? A few years ago, editors at St. Martin's Press held a contest. The results helped them to coin the term New Adult Fiction. What were they thinking when they came up with the term? And who did they think the readership would be? How did Indie authors impact the market? And where do you place these works of fiction in your collection? In this presentation we will: define New Adult Fiction and explore its history, identify books and publishers, and analyze its fast-paced success. At the end of the session, participants will: understand the significance of New Adult Fiction, identify motivated readers, and consider innovative ways to promote and integrate New Adult Fiction into their collections. Presenter: Ann Matzke, former Children's Director, Wilson Public Library, Cozad, NE.
Transcript
  • 1. What is this New Adult Fiction: A new category of literature or stepped up YA novels?
  • 2. Young Adult Literature The definition first appeared in 1968. Characteristics: Protagonist is a young adult 12-18 years of age Often written in first person Adults may be present but in the background Adult issues protagonist must deal with Protagonist may be rebellious, toward authority Often a sexual awakening occurs Protagonist often exists within the confines and rules of family and school The story leaves the readers with a sense of hope
  • 3. Young Adult Literature
  • 4. History Rachel Deahl, News Director at Publisher’s Weekly The category of New Adult definitely grew out of editors concerns… “worried about losing avid YA readers who are “ageing out”…and “eager to capture adult readers who have been reading down…” Thompson, Ricki, Matzke, Ann, and Angel, Ann. "Young Adult and New Adult Content: Developing Themes of Substance for Readers." Annual Conference of the Association of Writer's and Writing Programs. Minneapolis, Minnesota. 9 Apr. 2014. Lecture.
  • 5. History St. Martin’s Press editor, Dan Weiss coined the term New Adult in 2009 as part of a contest. He was soliciting manuscripts targeting “emerging adults who are navigating career, love and family in a 24/7 connected world.” Thompson, Ricki, Matzke, Ann, and Angel, Ann. "Young Adult and New Adult Content: Developing Themes of Substance for Readers." Annual Conference of the Association of Writer's and Writing Programs. Minneapolis, Minnesota. 9 Apr. 2014. Lecture.
  • 6. Definition New Adult New Adult (NA) fiction is a developing genre/category of fiction with protagonists in the18–25 age bracket (sometimes stretching to 30) exploring what it means to be an adult.
  • 7. New Adult Characteristics: Older protagonist Other adults present Sexually more graphic Often written in first person NA protagonist is more self- aware than YA protagonist Protagonist is responsible for self Romance- male characters are hot with lots of tattoos Story leaves the reader with a sense of hope
  • 8. New Adult Possible Themes: College life First time living alone First jobs First serious relationship Identity issues Sex Experimentation Struggle to “find yourself” Change Money problems
  • 9. Indie Authors New Adult authors are young Writing about things they’ve experienced Cora Carmack, New York Times Bestselling Author “As a 20-something myself, I know my generation lives in a time of extraordinary change. We are a generation marked by a marriage between ‘dream big’ idealism and unavoidable stark realism. New adult acknowledges that unique perspective.” Klems, Brian. "New Adult: The Next Big Thing?" Writer's Digest 15 Nov. 2013. Print.
  • 10. Emerging Indie Authors 2011 Abbi Glines self-published The Vincent Boys and the sequel, The Vincent Brothers. Published online as Young Adult novels Simon & Shuster’s YA imprint, Simon Pulse acquired both novels. Republished in December, 2012.
  • 11. Cora Carmack November 2012 Cora signed a six-figure, three- book deal with HarperCollins. Based upon her chart-topping success of her self-published New Adult e-book, Losing It.
  • 12. E-Book History In 2012, the New Adult category gained momentum when many independently published New Adult novels appeared on bestseller lists as E-Books.
  • 13. Digital Formats New Adult novels reach a wider audience in digital formats. Rose Hiliard, Editor at St. Martin’s Press “Those who read on devices seem more concerned with intense, immediate action and have less patience for subtlety, texture, nuance, and descriptive language—qualities that work much better in print.” Klems, Brian. "New Adult: The Next Big Thing?" Writer's Digest 15 Nov. 2013. Print.
  • 14. Elements of Success Independent e-book publishing has been the driving force behind the rapid growth of NA. Online venues encourage NA authors and novels that were usually shut out of the regular market to create their own place.
  • 15. Book Promotion New Adult started as a grassroots phenomenon driven by readers and the savvy self-publishing authors. Word of Mouth Social Media Bloggers –blogs such as A Tapestry of Words Online book hubs – Goodreads Newer co-op websites- NA Alley
  • 16. Core NA Books Published by Indie Authors Abbi Glines The Vincent Boys, The Vincent Brothers Jamie McGuire Beautiful Disaster, Walking Disaster Cora Carmack Losing It Series Colleen Hoover Hopeless, Slammed Jay Crownover Marked Men Series Tamara Webber Easy, Breakable and Sweet
  • 17. Most read NA titles this week RoomHate by Penelope Ward Soulless by T.M. Frazier A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas Never Never by Colleen Hoover and Tarryn Fisher November 9 By Colleen Hoover Confess by Colleen Hoover Beautiful Burn by Jamie McGuire
  • 18. NA Alley New Adult Titles Breaking New Ground for Print Distribution  On September 2nd, New Adult pioneer Jamie McGuire announced a ground breaking distribution deal for indie publishing.  For the first time ever, the books that she has put out on her own are going to be available in a brick-n- mortar superstore, specifically Walmart.  McGuire jumped out ahead of the New Adult trend years ago when she published Beautiful Disaster, and she's stayed ahead of the curve ever since. But with this deal, she's actually laying new ground for indie and New Adult alike.
  • 19. NA Content Controversy Public Criticism – NA is “sexed-up YA” comes on the heels of the Fifty Shades of Grey phenomenon Marketing schemes using erotically charged themes to entice teens to read NA Sara Megibow, agent with Nelson Literary Agency disagrees with the public criticism of NA. “The good New Adult submissions I’ve seen tend to focus on the conflicts of early adulthood—dating, jobs, first apartments, money, identity, self-sufficiency.” Klems, Brian. "New Adult: The Next Big Thing?" 15 Nov. 2013. Print.
  • 20. Who’s reading NA? Katie Stover, Kansas City Public Library (MO) “Readers tend to be urbanites, wired and techno-savvy, and on top of trending cultural- political-social issues. They are checking out books with edgy content, zippy plotting, identifiable characters, and unusual narrative structures.” Becky Spratford, Berwyn Public Library (IL) “NA books are circulating well, but to all adults under 40, not just the 20- to 30-year olds we thought they would appeal to. Specifically, the romances are hugely popular with my under-50 romance readers.” Engberg, Gillian, and Donna Seaman. "What Is New Adult Fiction?" Booklist 1 Aug. 2014. Print.
  • 21. What are patrons saying? “I want to read about characters being out in the world on their own for the first time-like living alone, landing that big job and making friends. But more of the NA books I’ve been reading skip over those kinds of things instead focusing on OMG HOT Guys! Just look at the book covers.” “I like the premise of these books but it’s frustrating because the characters are all white. There’s not enough diversity of characters and genres for me.”
  • 22. Young Adult vs New Adult Blurry Borders Books that crossover Sophie Brookover, Library Link (NJ) “YA fantasy, Sci-fi and historical fiction crosses up easily to NA.” Age of maturity is measured differently. Teen characters independent at a younger age. Or NA marketed as YA Thompson, Ricki, Matzke, Ann, and Angel, Ann. "Young Adult and New Adult Content: Developing Themes of Substance for Readers." Annual Conference of the Association of Writer's and Writing Programs. Minneapolis, Minnesota. 9 Apr. 2014. Lecture.
  • 23. The Crossover American Library Association’s The Alex Awards are given to ten books written for adults that have special appeal to young adults, ages 12 through 18. The Alex Awards were first given annually beginning in 1998 and became an official ALA award in 2002.
  • 24. Where do we shelve NA?
  • 25. How do we promote NA books?
  • 26. In conclusion  Questions to ponder:  Do we need a NA category?  Does the category serve the writer or the reader?  Will it continue to exist mainly as romance?  Will writers feel a need to write non-romance NA?
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