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Bibliography & In-text citations. Feb. 6, 2014. What is a Bibliography?. A list of all of the sources you have used in your research Also known as “Works Cited” Bibliography = Works Cited At the end of the paper (last page). 2 most commonly used styles  APA and MLA APA
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Bibliography & In-text citations Feb. 6, 2014 What is a Bibliography?
  • A list of all of the sources you have used in your research
  • Also known as “Works Cited”
  • Bibliography = Works Cited
  • At the end of the paper (last page)
  • 2 most commonly used styles  APA and MLA
  • APA
  • Used for psychology, education, nursing, and other social sciences
  • MLA
  • Used for literature, arts, and humanities
  • We are using this one!
  • How to write a Bibliography
  • Keep track of each source you find and use in your research
  • Make an organizer
  • Write down the full title, author, place of publication, publisher, and date of publication
  • Example: Author/Writer: __________________________ Full title: ________________________________ Place of publication: ______________________ Publisher: _______________________________ Date of publication: _______________________
  • After gathering the notes, format the information
  • A bibliography is written differently according to the medium (books, website, magazine, etc)
  • Author/Writer: _______________ Full title: ____________________ Place of publication: __________ Publisher: ___________________ Date of publication: ___________ Dean, Cornelia. "Executive on a Mission: Saving the Planet." New York Times. New York Times, 22 May 2007. Web. 25 May 2009. Books
  • Author’s name (last name first!), title (italicized), place of publication, publisher, date, medium
  • Example
  • Tan, Amy. Saving Fish from Drowning. New York: Putnam, 2005. Print
  • Tan, Amy  author (last name first)
  • Saving Fish from Drowning  Title
  • New York  Place of publication
  • Putnam  Publisher
  • 2005  Date
  • Print  Medium
  • Encyclopedia
  • Author’s name (if there is one), title of the entry (in quotes), title of the reference work, edition number (if any), date of the edition, medium
  • Example
  • Posner, Rebecca. “Romance Languages.” The Encyclopedia Britannica: Macropaedia. 15th ed. 1987. Print.
  • Posner, Rebecca  author
  • “Romance Languages”  Title of the entry
  • The Encyclopedia Britannica: Macropaedia Title of the reference work
  • 15thed  Edition number
  • 1987  Date
  • Print  Medium
  • Article in a magazine
  •  Author’s name, title of the article (in quotes), title of the magazine (italicized), date, medium
  • Example
  • Lord, Lewis, “There’s Something about Mary Todd.” US News and World Report 19 Feb. 2001: 53. Print
  • Website (online)
  • Author’s name, title of the site (italicized), sponsor, date of publication (or last update), medium, date you accessed it
  • Example
  • Peterson, Susan Lynn. The Life of Martin Luther. Susan Lynn Peterson, 2005. Web. 24 Jan. 2009.
  • Database (online)
  • Author’s name, title of the entry (in quotes), title of the whole source (italicized), name of the database (italicized), publication date, medium, date you accessed it
  • Example
  • Johnson, Kirk. “The Mountain Lions of Michigan.” Endangered Species Update 19.2 (2002): 27-31. Expanded Academic Index. Web. 26 Nov. 2008.
  • Writing a Bibliography Page
  • List your sources in alphabetical order by authors' last names
  • Write in a hanging indent style
  • All lines (text) are indented except the first line
  • Example of a Bibliography Page Dean, Cornelia. "Executive on a Mission: Saving the Planet." New York Times. New York Times, 22 May 2007. Web. 25 May 2009. Ebert, Roger. "An Inconvenient Truth." Rev. of An Inconvenient Truth, dir. Davis Guggenheim. rogerebert.com. Sun-Times News Group, 2 June 2006. Web. 24 May 2009. Gowdy, John. "Avoiding Self-organized Extinction: Toward a Co-evolutionary Economics of Sustainability." International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology 14.1 (2007): 27-36. Print. Leroux, Marcel. Global Warming: Myth Or Reality?: The Erring Ways of Climatology. New York: Springer, 2005. Print. Milken, Michael, Gary Becker, Myron Scholes, and Daniel Kahneman. "On Global Warming and Financial Imbalances." New Perspectives Quarterly 23.4 (2006): 63. Print. Practice 1
  • Book
  • Medium  Print
  • Publisher  Springer
  • Author’s name  Marcel Leroux
  • Title  Global Warming
  • Place of publication  New York
  • Date  2005
  • Leroux, Marcel. Global Warming. New York: Springer, 2005. Print.
  • Practice 2
  • Website (Online Newspaer)
  • Date of publication  03 Oct. 2013
  • Title of the article  For Better Social Skills, Scientists Recommend a Little Chekhov
  • Author’s name  Pam Belluck
  • Date you accessed it  16 Dec. 2013
  • Sponsor  The New York Times
  • Medium  Web
  • Belluck, Pam. "For Better Social Skills, Scientists Recommend a Little Chekhov." The New York Times, 03 Oct. 2013. Web. 16 Dec. 2013.
  • Practice 3
  • Database (online)
  • Publication date  1994
  • Name of the database  JSTOR
  • Author’s name  Tim Gillespie
  • Title of the entry  Why Literature Matters
  • Medium  Web
  • Title of the whole source  The English Journal 83.8
  • Date you accessed it  16 Oct. 2013
  • Gillespie, Tim. "Why Literature Matters." The English Journal 83.8 (1994). JSTOR. Web. 16 Oct. 2013.
  • In-text citation
  • Similar to bibliography
  • Simple & Shorter
  • In-text  Sources are cited in the text
  • Format
  • Put the information you will use in quotes
  • Author’s name and a page number (in parentheses!)
  • (Wordsworth 25)
  • Online sources may not have page numbers
  • You can number the paragraphs
  • If there is no author, use the title
  • In-textcitation
  • Example
  • Most works of literature raises some kind of moral questions. However, “literature does not teach morals in a didactic way; rather, it gives us a chance to experience moral dilemmas”(Gillespie 18). Instead of reading about moral principles, we exercise them through literature.
  • More examples
  • Literature provides “aesthetic pleasure we take in good craftsmanship of any kind…well-ordered and well-chosen words are one of the few forms of immortality” (Pickering 4). This beauty in literature does not fade away.
  • At this moment, literature creates a special place, in which we are “sucked in, swept up, spirited away…enfolded in a blissful embrace” (Felski 55).
  • Whycitesources?
  • Think and discuss in pairs
  • What is the purpose of writing a bibliography and in-text citations?
  • Why is citing sources so important?
  • Plagiarism
  • Taking someone else’s work or ideas and passing them off as your own
  • This happens when you don’t cite the sources you’ve used!
  • http://www.toonpool.com/cartoons/Cartoon%20Plagiarism_183661 Reflection
  • Please write 3 things you learned from today’s lesson (3-5 sentences)
  • Explain the importance of citing sources in your own words (3-5 sentences)
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