Food-borne Illness

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Food-borne Illness. 1. Get out your journal. 2. Missing/Make-up DUE TODAY. Journal What is your favorite restaurant? If you were to take a guest to that restaurant, what are three menu items you would recommend?.
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Food-borne Illness 1. Get out your journal. 2. Missing/Make-up DUE TODAY JournalWhat is your favorite restaurant? If you were to take a guest to that restaurant, what are three menu items you would recommend? Foodborne Illness: a sickness that results from eating food that is not safe to eat Common Symptoms: -Diarrhea -Abdominal Cramps - Fever -Headache -Vomiting **May develop as early as a half hour after eating contaminated food or may not develop for up to two weeks. Food-borne Illnesses Botulism -home canned or store canned foods that are not sealed properly (green beans) -foods that are cooked and then “held” in the temperature “danger zone” (baked potatoes) (Make list of 4 food-borne illnesses on bottom of your notes.) Salmonella -found in products with uncooked eggs or chicken -present on reptile skin Giardia -found in contaminated water supplies (camping) E-coli -comes from fecal matter -common in restaurants because workers do not wash their hands after going to the bathroom Cross-Contamination: the transfer of disease-causing microorganisms to food by hands, food-contact surfaces, sponges, cloth towels, and utensils that touch raw food. Can also occur when raw food touches or drips onto cooked or ready-to-eat food. How to Keep Foods Safe
  • Wash
  • -Hands with soap and water.
  • -Dishcloths and sponges weekly in hot water in
  • the washing machine.
  • -Cutting boards with hot water, soap, and a
  • scrub brush.
  • -Clean blade of can opener after each use.
  • -Fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Separate
  • Don’t Cross-Contaminate:
  • -Keep raw meat, poultry, fish and other juices away from other food.
  • -After cutting raw meats, wash cutting board,
  • utensils, and countertops with hot, soapy water
  • or a solution of 1 Tablespoon chlorine bleach in 1 gallon of water.
  • -Never serve cooked food on the same plate or platter that held raw food.
  • Cook
  • -Cook food to the proper internal temperatures.
  • -Check temperature with a food/meat
  • thermometer.
  • (Most cookbooks will tell you what temperature a specific meat should reach.)
  • Cook – Food Temperature Keep cold foods cold and hot foods hot. -Cold foods should be kept at temperatures below 40°. -Hot foods should be kept at temperatures above 140°. Danger Zone: 40°-140° (Bacteria can double in as little as 20 minutes in this zone.)
  • Chill
  • -Refrigerate or freeze perishables, prepared
  • food, and leftovers within two hours.
  • -Keep cold foods in the refrigerator or on ice.
  • Storage
  • -Meat/poultry should be wrapped securely to prevent juices from getting into other foods. -Discard canned goods that are dented, leaking, bulging, or rusted. -Leftovers:
  • -Discard any food left out at room temperature for more than two hours.
  • -Use cooked leftovers within four days.
  • When in doubt, throw it out!
  • Parties, Dinners, Grilling, Take-Out and Delivery Foods Two Hour Rule: Food should not sit at room temperature for more than 2 hours. If the weather is 90° and above, food should not sit out for more than 1 hour. (Exceptions: cookies, crackers, breads, whole fruits) Bag Lunches: -Use cold packs or insulated containers to keep cold foods cold and hot foods hot. -Cooked foods should not be left on the table or kitchen counter for more than two hours. -Foods with a “fat” base (like dips, mayonnaise, sauces) should not be left out for more than two hours. -Leftovers should be used within three days to five days. If in doubt, throw it out. -Never taste any food that looks or smells “off” or comes out of leaking, bulging, or severely damaged cans or jars with leaky lids. Keep hot foods hot and cold foods cold. counter for more than two hours. If in doubt, throw it out. For More Information counter for more than two hours. about Food Safety United States Department of Agriculture Provides basic information about food safety, hot and cold temperature storage, mold, bacteria, etc. www.usda.gov Central District Health Department of Idaho website Click on “Inspections” to gain information about health inspections at local restaurants. www.cdhd.idaho.gov
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