Robert Louis Stevenson - Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

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Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Stevenson, Robert Louis Published: 1886 Type(s): Novels, Horror Source: Wikisource 1 About Stevenson: Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading rep- resentative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. He was the man who seemed to pick the right word up on the point of his pen, like a man playing spillikins , as G. K. Chesterton put it. He wa
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  Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde Stevenson, Robert Louis Published:  1886 Type(s):  Novels, Horror Source:  Wikisource 1  About Stevenson: Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850–December 3,1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading rep-resentative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. He was the manwho seemed to pick the right word up on the point of his pen, like aman playing spillikins , as G. K. Chesterton put it. He was also greatlyadmired by many authors, including Jorge Luis Borges, Ernest Heming-way, Rudyard Kipling and Vladimir Nabokov. Most modernist writersdismissed him, however, because he was popular and did not writewithin their narrow definition of literature. It is only recently that criticshave begun to look beyond Stevenson's popularity and allow him a placein the canon. Source: Wikipedia Also available on Feedbooks for Stevenson: ã Treasure Island  (1883)ã The Black Arrow  (1884)ã Kidnapped  (1886)ã Essays in the Art of Writing  (1905)ã The New Arabian Nights  (1882)ã  A Christmas Sermon  (1900)ã The Master of Ballantrae  (1889)ã The Silverado Squatters  (1883) Note:  This book is brought to you by Feedbooks.http://www.feedbooks.comStrictly for personal use, do not use this file for commercial purposes.  2  ToKatherine De MattosIt's ill to loose the bands that god decreed to bind;Still we will be the children of the heather and the wind.Far away from home, O it's still for you and meThat the broom is blowing bonnie in the north countrie. 3  Chapter  1 Story of the Door Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance that wasnever lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary and yet somehow lov-able. At friendly meetings, and when the wine was to his taste,something eminently human beaconed from his eye; something indeedwhich never found its way into his talk, but which spoke not only inthese silent symbols of the after-dinner face, but more often and loudlyin the acts of his life. He was austere with himself; drank gin when hewas alone, to mortify a taste for vintages; and though he enjoyed thetheater, had not crossed the doors of one for twenty years. But he had anapproved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy,at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any ex-tremity inclined to help rather than to reprove. I incline to Cain'sheresy, he used to say quaintly: I let my brother go to the devil in hisown way. In this character, it was frequently his fortune to be the lastreputable acquaintance and the last good influence in the lives of down-going men. And to such as these, so long as they came about his cham- bers, he never marked a shade of change in his demeanour.No doubt the feat was easy to Mr. Utterson; for he was undemonstrat-ive at the best, and even his friendship seemed to be founded in a similarcatholicity of good-nature. It is the mark of a modest man to accept hisfriendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that wasthe lawyer's way. His friends were those of his own blood or thosewhom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were thegrowth of time, they implied no aptness in the object. Hence, no doubtthe bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, thewell-known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what thesetwo could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common.It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks,that they said nothing, looked singularly dull and would hail with  4
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